Return Health

Return to Health
Health & Safety Plan During COVID-19

Overview

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Establishing a New Normal During COVID-19

The COVID-19 pandemic has immensely changed our lives in so many ways. As our understanding of the virus evolves, we must work together to mitigate the risk in our community, while still educating and supporting the health and well-being of our students.

We are establishing new norms within our schools and office spaces – understanding it will take time and constant positive reinforcement to teach and learn these new ways of being. 

We urge our community to lean into this new normal and create a physically and emotionally safe space for everyone.

Physical distancing does not come naturally or easy. Maintaining physical distance violates so many of our social norms, especially for those we are closest with. As we adjust to this new normal, it is okay to politely correct one another when we breach public health measures. 

The medical community teaches “gratitude – not attitude” when anyone corrects each other about safety precautions – no matter their role or title.   

As we navigate our new normal, we must support each other in remaining humble and flexible. We continue to learn about COVID-19, and as the science changes our responses may need to change as well.  We may find ourselves adopting new strategies or measures — and quickly having to revise our plans .  

As the CDC advises, the most important actions for districts and school administrators to take while providing services and reopening schools for in-person learning is planning and preparing. The following Return to Health plan outlines all the procedures, policies and details for our community to follow to Return Together.

Public Health Recommendations

Overview

This plan was developed using recommendations from the Sacramento County Office of Education, Sacramento County Public Health, California School Nurses Organization, California Department of Public Health, California Department of Education and the Centers for Disease Control to meet the unique needs of our school community. 

California Department of Public Health Schools Guidance FAQs issued on August 3, 2020 states: 

“Under the operative executive orders (PDF) and 2020-21 Budget Act, schools must comply with orders and guidance issued by the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) and relevant local public health departments. Schools may comply with guidance from other federal, state, local, and non-governmental sources, to the extent those guidelines are consistent with state and local public health directives.” 

The Return to Health Plan serves as the SCUSD COVID-19 Safety Plan (CSP) for in-person instruction and meets the California Division of Occupational Safety and Health (Cal/OSHA) COVID- 19 Prevention Program (CPP) and the COVID-19 School Guidance Checklist requirements.  Recent evidence cited by the CDC suggests when K-12 schools consistently implement layers of mitigation strategies they are able to safely open for in-person services, supports, and instruction.  The SCUSD Return to Health plan provides our operational strategy to support K-12 schools in opening for in-person services, supports, and instruction, and remaining open through an integrated package of mitigation measures.

Multiple Layers Improve Success: The Swiss Cheese Respiratory Pandemic Defense recognizes that no single intervention is perfect at preventing the spread of the coronavirus.  Each intervention (layer) has holes, but multiple layers improve success.

SCUSD will remain flexible in responding to changing public health conditions and will continue to revise our Return to Health plans in accordance with the most current orders or guidance provided by the CDPH. Resources:

Criteria to Reopen for In-Person Instruction
Return to Health

Overview

In-Person Instruction Grant requirements

Purple tier (< 25 cases per 100K) – All students in grades TK-2

Red/orange/yellow tiers – All elementary grades, and one middle or high school grade

Senate Bill 86 allocates additional funding for in-person instruction, however districts/schools must offer continuous in-person instruction by April 1 (or the first day after Spring Break). After April 1, or the next scheduled day of school, districts will loose 1% of funding for each instructional day that passes without offering in-person instruction. In-person instruction must start by May 15 or all funding is forfeited. Districts must also post their COVID-19 Safety Plan at least 5 days prior to offering in-person instruction. To learn more see the Safe Schools for All Learning Hub website.

In-Person Reopening Criteria

Red (Tier 2/Substantial), Orange (Tier 3/Moderate) and Yellow (Tier 4/Minimal) County Risk Tiers: Schools must reopen for all elementary grades and at least one middle or high school grade districtwide. Schools are encouraged to reopen at all grades levels under the Blueprint for a Safer Economy. Schools that reopen must adhere to all updated guidance for schools.

Purple (Tier 1/Widespread) County Risk Tier

If a school was already open or was implementing a phased reopening while the county was in the Red Tier, the school site may continue to remain open if the county moves back to the Purple Tier. Under the preexisting CDPH Small Group/Cohort guidance, targeted in-person instruction must be offered for cohorts of prioritized students in all grades, including pupils with disabilities, pupils at risk for abuse or neglect, youth in foster care, youth experiencing homelessness, English language learners, pupils without access to online instruction and disengaged pupils.

District schools serving grades TK-6 not already open may reopen for in-person instruction in the Purple Tier when the following conditions are met:

  • Case Rates <25: Schools serving students in grades K-6 may only reopen for in-person instruction when the adjusted case rate is at 25 cases per 100,000 population per day or lower for 5 consecutive days.
  • COVID Safety Plan is approved and posted to their website homepage.

Teachers, school and support staff, and administrators may return to work physically while counties are not open for in-person instruction, provided that those on site follow all public health mitigation requirements outlined in this Return to Health plan.

Table 1. School Reopening Actions for In-Person, by Tier

Yellow

Case Rate less than 1*

Test Positivity below 2%

Orange

Case Rate 1-3.9*

Test Positivity 2 – 4.9%

Red

Case Rate 4-7*

Test Positivity 5-8%

Purple

Case Rate More than 7*

Test Positivity More than 8%

COVID-19 Safety Plan posted publicly for K-12th grades 5 days prior to in-person instruction.

To be eligible for grant funding:

  • All elementary grades must be reopened
  • At least one middle or high school grade is reopened across the district

COVID Safety Plan posted publicly for K-12th grades 5 days prior to in-person instruction.

To be eligible for grant funding:

  • All elementary grades must be reopened
  • At least one middle or high school grade is reopened across the district

COVID Safety Plan posted publicly for K-12th grades 5 days prior to in-person instruction.

To be eligible for grant funding:

  • All elementary grades must be reopened
  • At least one middle or high school grade is reopened across the district

Already reopened: COVID Safety Plan posted publicly by 02/01/21.

Not previously open:

COVID Safety Plan posted publicly for K-6, and submitted concurrently to LHD and State Safe Schools for All Team.

  • 7 business days for review.
  • 7th-12th grade reopening not permitted if CR>7*.
  • K-6th grade reopening not permitted if CR>25*, though COVID Safety Plan can be posted and submitted for review.

To be eligible for grant funding:

  • Grades TK-2 must be open by April 1
  • Targeted in-person instruction must be offered to prioritized students pursuant to the Cohorting Guidance

*Adjusted Case Rate

COVID-19 Testing
Return to Health

Overview

Used in combination with other mitigation strategies, COVID testing is an additional strategy to support safer in-person instruction. Testing may allow for early identification of cases and exclusion from school to prevent transmission. A negative test provides information only for the moment in time when the sample is collected. Individuals may become infectious shortly after having a negative test, therefore we must maintain all other public health mitigation strategies already in practice. Testing is being provided for free on a voluntary basis to all individuals. Parent/guardian notification and consent will be obtained for student testing.

Definitions

Symptomatic testing
  • Testing used for individuals with symptoms of COVID- 19, either at home or at school. Individuals are required to stay home and isolate.
Response testing
  • Testing used to identify positive individuals once a case has been identified in a given stable group. Response-based testing can be provided for symptomatic or asymptomatic individuals with known or suspected exposure to an individual infected with COVID.
Asymptomatic/Surveillance testing
  • Asymptomatic or surveillance testing may be used for screening to identify asymptomatic or pre-symptomatic cases, in order to exclude cases that might otherwise contribute to in-school transmission. Registered students will automatically be tested according to the testing cadence below.  Parents may remove consent at any time by providing written notice to the school site.

COVID testing is provided through the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) with testing kits processed through the Valencia Branch Laboratory. CDPH will provide test kits, test registration software, test processing, and technical assistance through this effort.  SCUSD will cover all operational costs.

SCUSD is exploring all readily available COVID-19 testing options provided through the CDPH and SCPH to ensure we have the knowledge and capacity to provide COVID-19 testing. 

Two Types of COVID-19 Testing May Be Used

1. Self-Administered PCR test 

  • Identifies individuals infected with the COVID-19 virus
  • Typically used for asymptomatic and symptomatic testing
  • PCR COVID-19 Testing will be available for employees and students.
  • Results in 24-48 hours once received by the laboratory
  • Contact school site office for testing schedule and registration link

 2. Self-Administered BinaxNOW Rapid Antigen Test 

  • Identifies individuals who have an active infection
  • Typically used for symptomatic or response testing
  • SCUSD has successfully obtained a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendment (CLIA) Certificate of Waiver allowing the district to provide rapid antigen testing 
  • The rapid antigen test will be available to employees and students
  • Results are provided within 15 minutes

The chart below outlines increased levels of testing in the higher tiers due to the increased spread of COVID in the community and the higher likelihood that someone in the school community will be infected with COVID.

Testing Frequency for Education Staff and K-12 Students    

Yellow

Case Rate less than 1*

Test Positivity below 2%

Orange

Case Rate 1-3.9

Test Positivity 2 – 4.9%

Red

Case Rate 4-7

Test Positivity 5-8%

Purple

Case Rate More than 7 

Test Positivity More than 8%

Case Rate greater than 14

Symptomatic and response testing

 

Symptomatic and response testing

 

Symptomatic and response testing 

AND

Every 2 weeks asymptomatic testing

 

Symptomatic and response testing

AND

Every 2 weeks asymptomatic testing

Symptomatic and response testing and Weekly asymptomatic

(PCR or twice weekly antigen testing)**

* The case rates above are adjusted case rates posted on the CA COVID website

** Weekly asymptomatic testing assumes the use of a PCR test. If antigen testing is used, testing should be completed twice weekly.

Students or staff who have tested positive for active infection with SARS-CoV-2 virus within the last 90 days are exempt from asymptomatic testing.

COVID-19 Vaccine

Overview

CDPH strongly recommends that all persons eligible for the COVID-19 vaccine receive them at the first opportunity. COVID-19 vaccines authorized by the FDA have been shown to be safe and effective. Current vaccines are approved for individuals 12 years and older.  Three vaccines are currently available, Moderna, Pfizer/BioNTech and Johnson & Johnson, which have shown strong efficacy against getting sick with COVID-19, and 100% effectiveness for severe illness requiring hospitalization or death.  Vaccine trials for young children are currently underway.

Vaccines help our immune system fight infections in the future. COVID-19 vaccines will protect us from the virus that causes COVID-19 without having to get the illness.  It typically takes a few weeks after the last dose in a series to become fully protected. On the days after taking the vaccine, you may have a sore arm, aches, fatigue or fever, but these are not harmful. These symptoms signal that your immune system is developing protection against the virus.

As more vaccines are approved and production and distribution increases, vaccines are becoming available to an ever widening range of groups.  School districts, such as SCUSD, that operate Immunization Clinics through the Vaccine for Children (VFC) program are able to provide COVID-19 vaccine.  SCUSD is committed to working closely with SCPH to provide access to COVID-19 vaccine to all educators, education support staff and students.  SCUSD has hosted a series of vaccination clinics in partnership with Dignity Health, University of California Davis and other health partners to do ur part in stopping the spread of COVID in our community.

For more information on COVID vaccines visit the CDC or CDPH Vaccinate all 58 websites.

Download the COVID-19 Vaccination Information Flyer

Health Precautions for Students and Staff
Return to Health

Overview

Layers of Safety

As we discuss mitigation measures, it is important for our community to know how COVID-19 is spread and controlled. COVID-19 is mostly spread by respiratory droplets released into the air when people talk, sing, laugh, cough, or sneeze.  The interventions below are listed in order of effectiveness at reducing the spreading COVID.  While research on the spread of COVID continues, the top three items are likely of similar importance:

  1. Face coverings
  2. Stable groups/Cohort
  3. Physical distancing
  4. Adequate ventilation
  5. Hand Hygiene
  6. Health Screening
  7. Surveillance/screening testing

Each strategy (face coverings, stable groups, distancing, etc.) decreases the risk of in-school transmission, however no one layer is 100% effective. Rather, it is the combination of layers that are most effective and have been shown to decrease transmissions. Frequent disinfection which was originally included on this list has been found to have insignificant impact on COVID-19 transmission and is recommended only after there is potential exposure in a school site.  Please see SCUSD Disinfecting Protection Procedures.

Mitigation Requirements for Students and Staff
Return to Health

Overview

To help prevent additional spread and to keep our schools open, our students and staff will be required to practice the following personal prevention measures:

Health Screening

Passive (Self) Screening

Staff and students must self-screen  for symptoms at home daily. This is called passive screening (see subsequent pages for screening questions).

Symptoms of illness

If a person is sick or exhibits any symptoms of COVID-19, they may not come to school and will follow Stay at Home and Return to School Requirements (Appendix B). Signs of illness include fever or chills (100.4 degrees or higher), cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, fatigue, muscle or body aches, headache, new loss of taste or smell, sore throat, congestion or runny nose, nausea or vomiting, and diarrhea per CDC guidelines. They must stay home until ONE OF the following are met:

  • At least 24 hours without fever, and symptoms have improved, and a COVID-19 test is negative, OR
  • At least ten days has passed since first symptoms appeared, OR
  • A healthcare provider gives documentation that the symptoms are from an underlying chronic condition or other district process
Chronic Conditions

Individuals with non-infectious chronic conditions should not be excluded from attending school or work. For instance, an individual with allergy symptoms may have congestion, but is not a reason to exclude them from attending work or school. If a student or staff member has chronic allergic or asthmatic symptoms (e.g., cough or runny nose), then a change in their typical symptoms (new symptoms or worsening of symptoms) would be considered a new symptom. A doctor may diagnose an illness other than COVID-19 and provide a note for return to school earlier than 10 days. If there are questions about individual cases, contact your school nurse or Health Services. Individuals may return to work/school if released by their physician.

Exposed to COVID-19

If a person has had close contact, defined as within 6 feet for at least 15 minutes within the last 10 days, with a person with confirmed COVID-19 they must stay home in quarantine for 14 days from the last date of contact. If an individual in the home is suspected of having COVID and is awaiting test results, all other individuals should remain home until test results are confirmed.

Travel

For travel outside the local area (i.e. more than 120 miles from one’s residence), the CDPH Travel Advisory strongly advises individuals stay home in self-quarantine for 14 days from the date they returned home, monitor health, and practice physical distancing.  CDC and CDPH recommends avoiding all nonessential travel. If you must travel, follow the recommendations in the Global COVID-19 Pandemic Notice, in addition to any travel health recommendations provided on the webpage for your destination and in relevant notices below.

Download Screen at Home - 4 Questions and Instructions

Active Screening - Temperature Checks and Identifying Sick or Exposed Persons on Site

Active screening requires all students and staff entering a site to be screened for illness and exposure including a temperature check and review of signs and symptoms of illness. Any student or staff with symptoms of COVID or who are required to quarantine per CDC guidelines may not enter the school site and will be advised to return home.

SCUSD will be implementing a daily reminder system for home screening through an online screening application for families, students and staff. For those who do not have access to the application, a list of screening questions will be provided for daily review at home and upon entry to the school or work site.

Students and staff must enter through required controlled entry and exit locations at each site. Sites shall set up controlled entry and exit screening locations and ensure staff and students understand and follow disease prevention precautions. Students and staff approaching the entry must be wearing a face covering. Face coverings will be available for those who do not have their own. If possible, parents/guardians should remain with their student(s) until they are admitted to site in case the student(s) needs to return home.

Process for Daily Student Screening

  • Students will wait in a line with appropriate physical distancing, and visual cues will be used to indicate spacing. Signage with reminders about distancing, masks, hygiene, and stay-at-home requirements and screening criteria will be posted.
  • If possible, have the parent/guardian remain with the student while screening occurs, in case the student is not well enough to attend school.
  • Staff instructions for student screening:
    • Take temperature
    • Look at the person for any visible signs of illness
    • Ask if they meet any of the criteria on the screening signage – or have them show their clearance on the screening app
  • If the temperature is less than 100.4 degrees, the student reports no sign or symptoms of illness, no exposure to COVID-19, no recent travel, and the student appears well, direct the student to wash hands and enter campus.
  • Any student not meeting any of the screening criteria must be sent home or directed to the care room until they can go home.
  • Any students or staff exhibiting one or more symptoms throughout the day will be required to wait in the identified care area until they can be taken home or to a healthcare facility, as soon as possible.

Physical Distancing

Everyone must practice physical distancing from other people at all times. Maintaining adequate space helps us avoid exposure to COVID-19 and slow its spread. At least 3 feet of physical distance must be maintained in classrooms between students and 6 feet between students and adults or adults to adults, with adherence to face covering requirements.  Appropriate physical distancing indoors can sometimes be difficult to maintain, such as when walking in a busy hallway or in large crowds, making required face coverings even more vital. 

Staff who work in a space together, such as an office or classroom, must ensure they maintain physical distance of at least 6 feet at all times, and must wear a face covering when in space with other individuals. Staff may not create their own bubble where these measures are breached. Individuals must eat and drink in designated spaces and maintain more than six feet of distance from other persons. The space must be well-ventilated — eating outdoors is best if weather permits.

Face Coverings

Use Face Coverings 

Wearing a face covering prevents a person from spreading respiratory droplets while talking, singing, breathing, or coughing. They are meant to protect both the wearer and other people in case the wearer is unknowingly infected (many people who have COVID-19 do not have symptoms).  Face coverings are one of the best tools we have to slow the spread of COVID-19.

Face coverings protect our community from the spread of COVID-19

  • All SCUSD staff, students in all grades, parents/guardians and visitors are required to wear a face covering indoors unless they are exempted by a physician or it is inappropriate for the age or developmental level of the individual. Fully vaccinated individuals must continue to wear a face covering during school and work.
  • In general, unvaccinated individuals (children or adults)  do not need to wear a mask outdoors, however people who are not fully vaccinated must wear a mask in crowded outdoor settings. Individuals participating in activities that involve sustained close contact (i.e. sports that require close contact) must continue to wear face coverings indoors and outdoors.
  • For staff who come into routine contact with others, CDPH recommends the use of disposable 3-ply surgical masks.  SCUSD will provide surgical masks to staff in regular contact with others.
  • Individuals may wear a face covering of their choosing that meets CDPH requirements, however SCUSD will also provide face coverings to all individuals who need them.  Face coverings should have 2 or more layers of breathable material, completely cover the nose and mouth and fit snugly against the sides of the wearer’s face and nose. See the CDC Guide to Masks for further information.
  • Face coverings must be worn at all times including while:
    • Entering or exiting school grounds or district spaces
    • Participants in youth and adult sports should wear face coverings when participating in the activity, even with heavy exertion, for all indoor activities.  Sports that are conducted outdoors with close contact also require a face covering. 
    • On school grounds with few exceptions
    • While on a school bus
    • Engaged in work, whether at the workplace or performing work off-site, when:
      • Interacting in-person with another individual
      • Working in any space visited by multiple people such as the front office, staff room, or hallways

Face Shields 

  • In limited situations where a face covering cannot be used for pedagogical or developmental reasons, (e.g., communicating or assisting young children or those with special needs) a face shield with a drape (per CDPH guidelines) can be used instead of a face covering while in the classroom as long as the wearer maintains physical distance from others. Staff must return to wearing a face covering outside of the classroom.
  • Face shields with a cloth drape can be used for those who are unable to wear face coverings for medical reasons. Per CDE and Cal/OSHA, considerations for face shields should include a cloth drape attached across the bottom and tucked into the shirt.
  • Staff must maintain physical distance from others, to the extent practicable.
  • Participants engaged in recreational play or in youth and adult sports should wear face coverings when participating in activity, even with heavy exertion as tolerated, for all indoor activities. Sports that are conducted outdoors with close contact also require a face covering. 
  • Staff must return to wearing a face covering when a face shield is no longer needed, and outside of the classroom.

Guidance for daily use of face coverings

  • Use a freshly washed or clean face covering for each onsite visit. 
  • Clean your hands with soap and water or hand sanitizer before touching the face covering. 
  • If you are not already wearing it, apply your face covering before coming onto the worksite.
  • Avoid touching the face covering.
  • Avoid eating or drinking while wearing the face covering. 
  • Face coverings should not have valves, as these permit droplet release from the covering, putting others nearby at risk. SCUSD will not permit face coverings with valves. 

How to remove a face covering

  • Wash your hands with soap and water or use hand sanitizer before touching the face covering. Avoid touching the front of the covering, which is contaminated. 
  • Only handle the face covering by the ties, bands or loops. 
  • Throw any disposable face covering in a waste container. 
  • Wash your face cloth covering by hand with warm water and soap or in the washing machine.
  • Wash your hands with soap and water or use hand sanitizer. 

California state guidance allows for times when a face cloth covering can be temporarily removed in the following situations: 

  • When people are eating or drinking.  Individuals must eat and drink in designated spaces and maintain more than six feet of distance from other persons who are not members of the same household.  The space must be well-ventilated – eating outdoors is best if weather permits.
  • For individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing, when the ability to see the mouth is essential for communication. Face shields with a cloth drape are recommended in this situation
  • When a person is not sharing a common area, room or enclosed space with others
  • Persons who are engaged in outdoor work or recreation when alone

When a face covering is temporarily removed, it should be placed in a clean paper bag (marked with the student’s name and date) until it needs to be put on again. Replace the mask as soon as you can after these activities to reduce risk of infection.

Brief Face Covering Breaks

Students may need limited face covering break throughout the day.  Signs students may display include fidgeting with the front of the face covering or removing it.  If a student removes their face covering, have them step outside until they are able to put their face covering back on. 

Check to see if the face covering is wet or soiled – provide a new face covering if needed.

Face covering breaks may be provided to individuals or a cohort on a limited basis, however the guidelines below must be strictly followed - 

  • Face covering breaks may only be taken outdoors with physical distancing of more than 6 feet
  • Time limited – typically 5-10 minutes
  • Follow the established procedures for safety removing and putting on a face covering

A face covering should not be worn in the following situations

  • Young children, especially those under age 2.
  • For individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing, where the ability to see the mouth is essential for communication. Face shields would be recommended in this situation
  • Persons with a developmental delay, medical condition, mental health condition, or disability that prevents wearing a face covering. This includes persons who are unable to remove a face covering without assistance. CDPH notes such medical conditions are rare
  • Persons exempted from wearing a face covering due to a medical condition must be confirmed by the school district health team, therapist or medical provider.
  • Spaces that are used by a person who cannot tolerate face coverings are less safe for others who share that environment. Schools will notify others who share those spaces. Additional mitigation strategies will be added to optimize safety such as longer social distances, clear plastic barriers, reducing duration of time in a shared environment, using outdoor or other highly ventilated spaces as possible.

What if a person refuses to wear a face covering? 

Continual efforts will be made using positive reinforcement teaching strategies to ensure face coverings are worn properly. If a concern about wearing masks arises, notify the assigned School Nurse and/or Health Services or assigned supervisor immediately for additional support. Each unique situation will be assessed and support strategies will be employed for the well-being and safety of all. In the event that a student who is not exempt from wearing a face covering continually refuses to wear one, the CDPH requires schools to provide distance learning for these individuals.

Hand Hygiene

All students and staff must wash hands frequently

All students and staff must wash hands frequently. Soap products marketed as “antimicrobial” are not necessary or recommended.  Soap products marketed as “antimicrobial” are not necessary or recommended. If soap and water are not available use district approved greater than 60% ethyl alcohol-based hand sanitizer. Training on effective hand washing and use of sanitizer must be provided to all students and staff.

Children under age 9 should only use hand sanitizer under adult supervision. Call Poison Control if consumed: 1-800-222-1222.

The following guidelines are recommended for school settings. At minimum, students and staff must wash their hands or use hand sanitizer: 

  • Upon arrival to the school site 
  • Before lunch 
  • Before leaving the site 
  • Upon entry to any new classroom 
  • When using the restroom 
  • When visibly dirty 
  • After using a tissue, coughing into hands 
  • Upon arriving home 

Promote Respiratory Hygiene

Use respiratory hygiene at all times on site. 

Once a tissue is used, throw it away in a waste container and then wash hands with soap and water or use hand sanitizer. Do not touch the face. Reinforce respiratory hygiene or cough/sneeze etiquette, including use of tissues and elbows by using signage, training, and lessons. See Appendix K for signage. 

Stable Groups/Cohorting

Assigning stable groups or cohorting is a strategy to prevent the spread of COVID-19 by limiting cross-over contact between groups and reducing the number of exposed individuals if one person is infected with COVID-19. These strategies work by keeping groups of individuals together, such as students and staff. Individuals within a cohort will limit physical proximity with other cohorts as much as practically possible. 

Staff working in offices or departments should work in separate areas or cohorts as much as possible to ensure that essential functions may continue in the event staff is impacted by COVID.  For example, if two staff typically work in a front office space they should work in separate spaces, trading off staffing the front office desk for breaks. These practices limit close contact and ensure if someone is quarantined or isolated to due to COVID, other staff members will not be impacted.

When developing cohorts, it is important to consider services for students, including but not limited to students with disabilities and English language learners, so that they may receive necessary services within the cohort while ensuring equity, integration, and all legal mandates.  If itinerant staff (e.g., speech language pathologists, teachers providing targeted supports, school psychologists, etc.) are required to provide services within existing cohorts, all mitigation measures will be followed. Itinerant staff members must follow all sign-in and out procedures at schools/work sites and keep detailed contact logs in the event of a positive case or exposure to COVID.

Benefits of cohorting 
  • Decreases opportunities for exposure or transmission of COVID-19
  • Breaks the chain of potential transmission
  • Reduces contact with shared surfaces
  • Facilitates efficient communicable disease follow-up in the event of a positive case, and
  • Allows for targeted COVID-19 testing, quarantine, and/or isolation of a single cohort (i.e. classroom) in the event of a positive case within a cohort

Elementary students can be kept with the same teacher and aides. Any instruction that is provided by other teachers such as electives may be done virtually. Students eat lunch and recess with their group at different times than other groups. Accommodating separate use of facilities by stable groups may require creative changes to schedules. 

In secondary school cohorting may be more difficult. To ensure secondary students have access to the courses and content they need, students and staff may be part of several classrooms with different groups of students. Middle school and High School classes are often larger than elementary and students typically have many different teachers.  There are various approaches to maintaining stable groups and minimizing crossover of students. Students can be assigned groups with teachers rotating between groups with the teacher maintaining more than 6 feet distancing from students. Teachers can work in teams assigned to stable groups of students. For more ideas about cohorting in secondary schools, see the COVID-19 and Reopening In-Person Instruction Framework & Public Health Guidance for K-12 Schools in California, 2020-2021 School Year, pages 18-21.

Staff Working in the Community
Return to Health

Overview

When going into the community for essential contact such as home visits, always use personal hygiene and distancing precautions. This includes hand washing/sanitizing, wearing a cloth face covering, distancing at least 6 feet, and respiratory hygiene. Consult with Health Services for specific questions, or for recommendations about situations that may put you at higher risk of exposure or may expose others to communicable disease such as COVID-19. 

Mitigation Standards for the Physical Environment at SCUSD Sites
Return to Health

Overview

To break the chain of potential transmission and to limit the risk of exposure to all our community members, we must follow the guidance below. When staff and students return to campus, they will return to a physical space that enables all individuals to follow recommended health precautions. To protect students, staff and visitors to school sites, SCUSD staff will evaluate all spaces and make modifications in order to maximize ventilation and meet physical distancing requirements and to minimize mixing between groups. This includes signage in every space with occupancy limits and health hygiene reminders. Below is a list of standards to be followed at each SCUSD site. 

All District Locations

Air Flow and Ventilation

SCUSD is ensuring there is sufficient ventilation in all school classrooms and shared workspaces per the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air- Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE).

  • HVAC filters will be replaced 3 times per year rather than once per year as is currently the practice.  MERV-13 filters will be installed wherever possible.
  • HVAC units are programmed to turn-on and run continuously for a minimum of 2 hours before and for a minimum of 2 hours after classrooms are occupied.
  • HVAC systems are reprogrammed to run continuously when windows and doors are open
  • In order to maximize outside airflow, windows and doors will be opened so long as it is deemed safe to do so.
  • Portable HEPA filtration units will be provided in classrooms where MERV-13 filtration is not available.
  • Specific practices to avoid:
    • Classrooms or buses with no ventilation or additional airflow
    • Classrooms or buses with increased airflow across occupants (e.g., oscillating or box fans blowing into the classroom

Entrances & Exits (Pick-Up & Drop-Off)

SCUSD will take every measure to minimize crowding at drop-off and pick-up times:

  • Consider staggering start and end times.
  • Student pick-up and drop-off should occur outside the school gates/entrance. Encourage parents to stay in cars when picking students up.
  • Add visual cues or barriers to direct traffic flow and ensure distancing if there is queuing.
  • Develop signage and processes to minimize interactions between families.
  • If possible, divide student entry points rather than funneling all students through the same entry space. These approaches can limit the amount of close contact between students in high-traffic situations and times.
  • Schools may need to lock entrances that are not set up with screening staff.
  • Provide access to hand washing or hand sanitizer and face coverings at entrances.

Essential Visitors

  • District locations and school campuses must remain closed to non-essential visitors.
  • Essential visitors include but are not limited to government agency staff conducting health and safety assessments, a parent/guardian attending an essential meeting, such as an Individual Education Plan (IEP) meeting, or participating in an essential service for their student related to their educational plan. Essential visitors may also include contracted services staff performing their work at a district facility.  Staff will not bring other individuals with them to the work site who are not employees, do not have valid business at the worksite, or do not have prior permission to be present.  See below Accessing School Sites.

Volunteers

  • Volunteers may be permitted on a limited basis to support the implementation of health and safety protocols.  Volunteers must follow all district clearance requirements and all health and safety requirements.  To limit exposure to COVID-19, volunteers may not join the classroom or any other established cohort, and should remain outdoors.  Volunteers must wear face coverings and maintain 6 feet or more distance from others to limit close contact or exposing other individuals.  Volunteers must pass all health screening requirements before entering the campus, and must follow all sign-in and sign-out procedures for contract tracing purposes.  Volunteers must report any exposure to COVID-19 or a positive COVID-19 test immediately to the school site administration.
     

Shared Objects/Supplies

  • Shared objects or supplies include devices, paper packets, books, photocopiers, etc.
  • Provide individualized supplies for each individual to the extent possible.
  • Limit the number of individuals using shared objects.
  • Provide additional access to hand washing or hand sanitizer near shared objects, such as photocopiers, etc.
  • Sort and pre-fill packets of paper 24 hours prior to distribution
  • Books do not need to be sanitized, however guidelines by the American Library Association state books should be quarantined for 3 days prior to re-distribution.
  • When distributing or collecting equipment and supplies, ensure hands are frequently washed and/or disinfected.
  • Staff will clean and disinfect non-paper items with the district-approved disinfectant

Meetings

  • In order to promote cohorting and limit the spread of COVID-19 among individuals and cohorts, conduct all staff meetings, professional development training and education, and other activities involving staff in a virtual space.
  • If strict physical distancing measures are in place and all other public health measures are employed, a meeting may take place physically if participants are not able to access the virtual space. See below Accessing School Sites.
  • To limit spread among school campuses and further promote the cohorting of schools, meetings with staff from multiple schools or district locations will be solely held in a virtual format.
  • Staff who visit multiple school sites should strongly consider if their work may be completed remotely. If a site visit must occur, strict adherence to all public health measures must be observed.

Break Rooms & Break Times

  • Minimize the use and congregation of adults in staff rooms, break rooms, and other settings – ensure room limits and distancing requirements are visibly posted and enforced
  • Provide various spaces for individuals to take their breaks, such as protected outdoor spaces or alternate rooms.
  • Provide alternate break times so that staff do not congregate in spaces together.
  • Individuals must eat and drink in designated spaces and maintain more than six feet of distance. from other persons.  The space must be well-ventilated – eating outdoors is best if weather permits.  Individuals may not eat or drink while walking around or working within six feet of others.
  • Provide hand sanitizer and/or soap and disinfectant easily accessible at all times and near any shared objects such as equipment used by many people and doors. 
  • Staff should not drive together in a vehicle to socialize during break times or meals, unless they reside in the same household.

Common Areas

  • Modify areas such as waiting rooms, staff break rooms, work rooms, yards, quads, library, cafeteria and playgrounds to enforce physical distancing, for example: dots to indicate physical distancing requirements, squares, lines, arrows, and taped-off barriers.
  • Provide additional access to hand washing, hand sanitizer and/or disinfectant — especially near shared objects.
  • Close drinking fountains — encourage the use of reusable water bottles for students to use throughout the day.

Office Spaces

  • Provide plexiglass barriers when close contact is likely such as at the front desk that do not allow for physical distancing of at least 6 feet. 
  • Arrange staff desks at least 6 feet apart. 
  • Arrange desks and equipment away from flow of other staff members using the office. 

Bathrooms

  • Ensure all bathrooms have soap and paper towels, refuse containers.
    • Paper towels will be provided and are recommended for use over air dryers.
  • Evaluate stalls and urinals to ensure physical distancing between users. Tape off or install barriers.
  • Post clear signage for occupancy, hygiene, distancing.
  • Avoid taking large groups to the bathrooms at once (e.g., avoid having all classes use the bathroom right after lunch or recess) or maintain distancing in a line.

Hallways

  • Evaluate traffic flow and post arrows, signs and floor decals to guide flow in one direction. Provide delineator cones, stanchions or guide-ropes that create lanes in larger hallways.
  • Post signage that encourages safe greetings, the use of face coverings, and reminders to stop talking, yelling, singing, etc. while moving along hallways. 

School Sites

Designated Care Rooms

Sites must designate an area for sick individuals where they can be isolated while waiting to go home. See Appendix E. This room must be separate from the first aid room used for routine health procedures, first aid and medications.

  • Ensure good ventilation.
  • Ensure the following supplies are available: hand sanitizer, disposable face masks, face shields, gloves, disinfectant, thermometer, trash can with liner.
  • Room must be disinfected after each use. To reduce risk of exposure, wait 24 hours before you clean and disinfect. If it is not possible to wait 24 hours, wait as long as practicable. 
  • Room must be close to staff and supervised.
  • If more than one individual is sick, maintain at least 6 feet of distance between persons in the room and as much ventilation as possible.

Mealtimes/Cafeterias

When possible, meals will be served outdoors or in classrooms. Where cafeterias or group dining spaces must be used, students will remain in their stable groups with designated seating, physical distancing, and hand hygiene before and after eating. If indoor meal times are paired with recess or outdoor time, consider having half of a stable group of students eat while the other half is outdoors and then switch. Meals will be individually plated or bagged to avoid the sharing of utensils. Sharing of foods with members outside the household is not allowed.  

Classrooms

  • Sanitizer will be mounted to the wall at the doorway in every classroom.
  • Classrooms should open windows and doors if possible to maximize ventilation. 
  • Classroom layout should include:
    • Physical distancing between student desks/seating of at least 3 feet 
    • Continuous spacing of 6 feet must be provided for teaching staff at the front of the classroom.
    • Enough room near walls for students to move out of their desks. 
    • Limited use of large tables where students may slide around and breach the spacing between individuals. If using tables, mark off areas and alternate seating at each end of the table to ensure distancing.
  • Develop activities that model and reinforce good hygiene and physical distancing practices.
  • Limit sharing of materials/supplies; consider individual supply bags versus communal bins.
  • Clear off surfaces and cover bookshelves, shared spaces, and toy storage areas to limit touching or use of items.
  • For younger students:
    • Modify activities that bring students close together.
    • Use classroom materials to help students visualize the required 6-foot distance between people.
  • Activities that involve singing should be minimized and must only take place outdoors with face masks.
  • If necessary, utilize other campus spaces for instructional activities, such as lecture halls, gyms, auditoriums, cafeterias, and/or outdoors.
    • Consider holding class outdoors as much as possible. Resources about setting up outdoors classrooms can be found at www.greenschoolyards.org. School staff may take their class outside to complete an assignment in the fresh air; classes can rotate classes through an existing school garden space to use hands-on learning resources; or spread out across their playing field. Trees or other existing structures may be used to provide shade on warm days.
  • Provide supplies and protocol for disinfecting surfaces between classes or when student groups change
  • Staff will stack chairs and move trash at the end of the day in order to allow custodians to focus on more sanitizing duties
  • During times of distance learning staff may utilize the classroom for instruction provided that they follow all individual and environmental public health measures.

Band/Music

Activities where there is increased likelihood for aerosols, such as band practice, choir practice and performances, are permitted outdoors only, provided that at least six feet of physical distance is adhered to and the use of face coverings are implemented to the maximum extent possible.  Playing wind instruments (any instrument played by the mouth, such as a trumpet or clarinet) is discouraged. School officials, staff, parents, and students should be aware of the increased likelihood for transmission from exhaled aerosols during singing and band practice.

Physical Education Classes/Athletics

Physical education (PE) and intramural/interscholastic athletics should be limited to activities that do not involve physical contact with other students or equipment until advised otherwise by state/local public health officials. Ensure Personal Hygiene Precautions (Appendix D) in locker rooms, including physical distancing and use of face masks. This will result in fewer students in the locker room at a time.

  • Sports equipment must be designated and marked for each cohort youth sports group. This equipment will not be used by any other cohort youth sports group until it is disinfected.
  • Participants will wash their hands/ or use hand sanitizer prior to and immediately following activities where equipment and/or balls are handled by multiple individuals.
  • All athletic equipment must be disinfected after use by each cohort group. Coaches, trainers and other staff are responsible for ensuring all equipment used by students/athletes and coaches is sanitized after each use.
  • Avoid equipment sharing, and if unavoidable, disinfect shared equipment between use by different people to reduce the risk of COVID-19 spread.
  • Activities that require heavy exertion should be conducted outside in a physically distanced manner. 
    • Consistent with guidance for gyms and fitness facilities, face coverings must be worn during indoor physical conditioning and training or physical education classes (except when showering).
    • Face coverings may be removed for outdoor conditioning or activity that does not require close contact.  If the sport requires close contact (i.e. football), then face coverings must be worn. Please note this guidance may change in the near future.
      • Players should take a break from exercise if any difficulty in breathing is noted and should change their mask or face covering if it becomes wet and sticks to the player’s face and obstructs breathing. Masks that restrict airflow under heavy exertion (such as N-95 masks) are not advised for exercise.
  • There should be no shared athletic supplies, such as towels, clothing, shoes, or sports specific supplies, between students.
  • Youth sports programs and schools will provide information to parents or guardians regarding these guidelines, along with the safety measures that will be in place in these settings with which parents or guardians must comply

Large Gatherings – i.e., meetings, field trips & assemblies

  • Outdoor and indoor sporting events, assemblies, dances, rallies, field trips, and other activities that require close contact or that would promote congregating are not permitted at this time. 
  • Transitioning field trips to virtual opportunities.
  • Change events to a virtual format where appropriate.
  • (See Meeting section above) In order to promote cohorting and limit the spread of COVID-19 among individuals and cohorts of classes, conduct meetings, professional development training and education, and other activities involving staff in a virtual space.

Large Gathering Spaces – i.e. libraries, cafeterias & quads

  • Libraries: Develop standardized check-out & check-in procedures for distributing materials. Library spaces should remain closed due to the number of items and spaces that may be touched, however items may be distributed following the “Shared Objects/Supplies” guidelines.
  • Other large spaces: ensure occupancy, physical distancing measures, face coverings and all other public health measures are employed.

Support areas

  • Consider providing a safe place for students who need additional supports, study areas, after school tutoring, or internet access during distance learning. 
  • Set up these areas to comply with distancing guidelines using tape, signage etc.
  • Provide access to hand washing or hand sanitizer and face coverings at entrances.
  • Post clear signage for occupancy, hygiene, distancing. 
  • Provide supplies for disinfecting surfaces between students. 

Recess/Yards and Playspaces

Playgroup equipment may be utilized following the guidelines below.

  • Maintain cohorts or small groups; discourage mixing of large groups of students. 
  • Stagger playground use rather than allowing multiple classes to play together.
  • Limit activities where multiple classes interact.
  • Wash hands or use hand sanitizer before and after recess.
  • Maintain at least 3 feet of space from other children as much as possible.
    • When possible, build in visual cues that demonstrate physical spacing.
    • Face coverings may be removed when students are outside in the yard playing, moving and maintaining physical distancing of at least 6 feet.
  • If used, outdoor playgrounds/natural play areas only need routine maintenance. Students must wash or sanitize their hands before and after using these spaces 
  • Allow flexibility in recess policies and the use of teacher time to allow for supervision of classroom recess.
  • If picnic benches or seating is available outside — provide visual cues to reinforce physical distancing.

School Bus/Transportation

All Personal Hygiene Guidance must be followed on the school bus. In order to practice physical distancing on a school bus, the seating capacity must be reduced. This may necessitate the use of a seating chart to designate which seats are available.

  • Educate parents and students on the steps they must take to keep others safe during loading and unloading.
  • If a student appears visibly sick, parents will be asked to take the student home and follow Stay at Home Requirements (Appendix B).
  • Ensure physical distancing at bus stops and while loading and unloading.
  • All riders must wear a face covering while waiting for the bus and while riding the bus, unless contraindicated.
  • Each rider must use hand sanitizer before entering the bus.
  • CDPH guidance acknowledges that physical distancing may not be practicable on buses, therefore face coverings are essential. Physical distancing should be maximized to the extent practicable.
  • Ensure good ventilation with open/partially open windows.
  • Prevent students from walking past each other by taking the following measures: Seat students from the rear of the bus forward.Board students for the after school route based on the order in which students will be dropped off. Students who get off first should board last and sit in the front.
  • Buses should be thoroughly disinfected daily and after transporting any individual who is exhibiting symptoms of COVID-19.
  • Bus drivers should be provided disinfectant and disposable gloves to support disinfection of frequently touched surfaces during the day.
  • Students living in the same household may sit together on the bus.

Classroom Pets

At this time, more research is needed about the transmission of COVID between people and pets.  The CDC advises that animals that are at higher risk for infection with COVID-19 in the classroom are not allowed at this time. This includes animals such as cats, dogs, and small mammals like ferrets, hamsters, and rabbits.  For service dogs, however, the benefits of having the dog in the classroom for a particular individual can outweigh the risks for infection. A team decision, including but not limited to parent, student, student’s healthcare provider, administrator, teacher and school nurse will make decisions to allow service animals in the classroom on a case-by-case basis.  The team will refer to CDC guidance for Handlers of Service or Therapy Animals when making these decisions.

School/ Work Sites When Schools Are Closed

Overview

Use the following guidelines for situations in which staff must visit worksites to perform their work duties, interact with other staff, students or families, or for tasks that cannot be postponed or done over the phone or video conference. All standard health precautions outlined in the Return to Health plan must be adhered to.

Scenario 1: Delivery of Materials

  1. Staff will follow all measures outlined in in the RTH plan.
  2. Staff will remind participants about following all public health measures & will place visible signage reinforcing these practices. All participants must wear face coverings.
  3. Before the transfer, set up the plan and location to ensure safe interaction and distribution:
  4. Encourage a drive-up scenario with the recipient staying in their car.
  5. Ask the parent/guardian to place a sign with the student’s name in the car window or text staff once they have arrived onsite.Stagger pick up or meeting times to avoid extended waiting and maintain 6 or more feet of distance apart at all times.
  • Establish physical barriers between staff and recipients, such as, a table or gate.

  • Ensure that gloves, disinfectant, tissues and waste bins are available.

  • If a walk-up line is expected, place signage in the area to establish distancing of 6 or more feet apart.

  • If indoors, allow a maximum of 3 people in the line at a time with the remainder forming a line. outside with distancing of 6 or more feet apart.

  • Keep doors and windows open if possible to increase air ventilation.
  1. Sort and pre-fill envelopes of loose paper 24 hours prior to distribution. Books do not need to be sanitized, but allowed to quarantine for three days prior to distribution.
  2. Staff will handle equipment/medications/supplies with clean washed or gloved hands.
  3. Staff will clean and disinfect non-paper items with the district-approved disinfectant.
  4. Staff will leave the item on a clean surface at a safe distance for the recipient to pick up. Avoid touching the recipient or recipient’s vehicle.
  5. Wash hands, sanitize or re-glove after any contact or risk of contamination.
  6. Staff to document the distribution – avoid having the recipient touch anything.

Scenario 2: Essential Meetings at Work Sites (only if virtual meeting is not possible) 

Certain essential services necessitate in person meetings with students. These may include, but are not limited to educational services or assessments, vision & hearing screening, school based health services (i.e. dental services), speech therapy services and/or mental health services.

  1. Staff will follow all measures outlined in in the RTH plan.

  2. Before the meeting determine a specific list of assessments or therapy that needs to be done in-person (to facilitate efficiency during appointment).

  3. Gather and share as much information as possible on the phone or virtually.

  4. Scheduling considerations:

    • Notify supervisor, principal and/or plant manager prior to the meeting to ensure post-sanitizing is done. Keep in-person meeting time as brief as possible. 

    •  Schedule appointment with parent/guardian avoiding distance learning times whenever possible.

    • If assessing multiple students allow time between appointments to avoid overlap and inadvertent contacts between families. 

  5. Pre-screening and pre-meeting call 

  • Advise that attendees must always wear a face covering and maintain 6 feet distance when on site.

  • Call the parent/guardian the day before the appointment to conduct a health screening of individuals planning to come to the site per district screening policy.

  • Reschedule the appointment if anyone planning to come does not pass the health screening.

  • Notify parent/guardian that they will be screened again when arriving on site and provide district screening policy reminder. Inform them that for older students the parent may leave once the student has passed the health screening.

  • Remind families not to bring other people with them to the appointment if possible. Parents with multiple children may be asked to wait outside. Playgrounds are not available.

  • Advise them to enter through the main school door, to sign-in, obtain visitor’s pass.

  • Complete as much of the business as possible over the phone or virtually such taking history, filling out forms etc.

  1. Day of meeting guidelines: 

  • Prepare the meeting area: Identify a large room or area with good ventilation/fresh air from outside or conduct meeting outside 

    • Ensure health precaution signage is posted

    • Set up the space to maintain 6 or more feet distance between people, such as, physical barriers, table, counter, chairs placed apart

    • Wipe down any tables before the meeting using gloves and district-approved disinfectant

    • Provide tissues, a lined, no-touch waste basket and hand sanitizer

    • Provide face coverings for those that do not have them. 

  • All individuals must enter through the main office, sign in upon arriving at any site and conduct or confirm health screening.

  • If not done in the front office, staff with whom the appointment is with will conduct the health screening per district screening policy. All individuals must wash hands or use hand sanitizer.

  • If any individual does not pass the health screening they may not attend and the meeting may have to be rescheduled.

  • Remind participants to follow public health measures per signage – maintain physical distancing of at least 6 feet and wear a face covering.

  • Refrain from physical contact, such shaking hands or hugging – establish a contact-free greeting signal.

  • Keep meetings as short as possible. Minimize talking to only essential conversation.

  • If document signing is necessary, wash hands or use hand sanitizer before and after touching paper or pens. Advise each person use their own pen, if possible.

  • Disinfect tables and other surfaces between meetings with gloves and district-approved disinfectant.

  • Wash hands or use hand sanitizer before leaving the site.

  • Wash hands upon arrival to your home.

Scenario 3: Outdoor Home Check-in or Delivery

The following guidelines were developed to keep staff and families safe should providing a home delivery or check-in be essential. A home delivery or check-in may be completed when all other forms of establishing contact have been exhausted (calling and texting all phone numbers, emergency contact numbers, email addresses, etc.). Staff may not enter homes – all visits and interactions must be conducted outside. Scenarios in which staff may need to go out into the community for an essential visit may include, but are not limited to:

  • Establish contact with a family
  • Check on the well-being of a student
  • Communicate information
  • Deliver or pick up items

Staff will follow these recommendations to reduce the risk of exposure to COVID-19 for themselves and families in the community. For additional information consult your school nurse or the SCUSD Health Services Department:

  1. Staff will follow all measures outlined in the RTH plan.
  2. If a phone number is valid, leave a voicemail or text announcing when a home visit is planned (day/time frame), including the purpose of the visit.
  3. In the interest of safety, notify your supervisor of your plan. It is recommended that home visits are conducted with another staff member. Staff should drive to the location in separate cars, unless they are members of the same household.
  4. When arriving at the home, attempt phone contact again. If no answer, proceed with the home visit.
  5. Put on your face covering.
  6. Knock on the door, then move back 6 ft. per physical distancing guidelines.
  7. While at the door with face covering on, announce who the visitor is and which school they are affiliated with. Ensure that your district identification is visible. For example: “Hello, this is Name of Visitor(s), Title, from school name, I was hoping to speak with the parent/guardian of student name , the topic, (drop off materials, etc).
  8. Do not enter the home. Stay outside for the safety of all involved in the visit.
  9. Keep your conversations short. Arrange for follow up via phone, text, zoom, etc.
  10. Materials left should be placed on a clean, elevated surface, if possible, (ie. porch bench, hood of a car, over the handle of the door, etc) AND under the observation of the parent/guardian, while maintaining 6 ft. distancing.
  11. Place anything received into an envelope or bag.
  12. If no one answers, leave a business card at the door with return call, text or email information.
  13. Upon returning to the car, use hand sanitizer, if available. Sanitize any items received and personal items, as necessary. Remove the face covering appropriately by placing the covering into a paper bag, if available. Sanitize your hands once again.

SCUSD Disinfecting Materials

Overview

Due to the unprecedented nature of the Coronavirus (COVID-19), and the awareness surrounding it, the Sacramento City Unified School District understands the desire to protect students and ourselves from possible infection. 

Some items an individual may normally use at home are not allowed for use in schools due to State and Federal policies in place for student health and safety, unless properly trained by the California Department of Pesticide Regulations. 

Aerosol spray containers are not allowed on school property for safety reasons. 

While the district is making every effort to ensure that supplies are replenished at our school sites, the following is a list of items recommended for individual procurement and use: 

Hand Sanitizer 

It is recommended that hand sanitizer be at least 60% ethyl alcohol based in order to kill the virus and any other bacteria.

Disinfecting Wipes 

Disinfecting wipes are effective and allowable, but it is important to read and follow all instructions. If the product is not allowed to dwell on the surface long enough (typically 5 minutes) it will not kill all virus or bacteria. Also the wipe is only effective for use in a small area. For example, a large table or multiple desks would require more than one wipe. 

It is critical that individuals read and follow the directions for any cleaning product every time before use.

Proper Disinfecting Procedures
Return to Health

Overview

Regularly disinfect high-touch areas throughout the day. Frequently touched surfaces in the school include, but are not limited to: 

  • Door handles 
  • Light switches 
  • Sink handles 
  • Bathroom surfaces 
  • Tables 
  • Student Desks 
  • Chairs 

If an individual who is positive for COVID has been physically present, the spaces where the individual spent a large proportion of their time (e.g., classroom or office) should be disinfected. Frequent disinfection can pose a health risk to children and students due to the strong chemicals often used and so is not recommended in the school setting unless a positive case of COVID has been identified. 

Consistent with recommendations by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the district strives to select disinfectant products with ingredients that reduce the impact on those with asthma. 

Inventory Controls

  • Order supplies for start and plan for inventory management:
    • Face coverings — for students and staff, individuals can be encouraged to use their own cloth face covering 
    • Disposable face coverings for sick room. 
    • Face shields or goggles for sick room and for teachers 
    • Hand sanitizer — in every room, used by every individual entering 
    • Spray bottles and disinfectant and paper towels — every room to clean surfaces 
    • Gloves — for use in case of vomiting or helping sick or injured students 
    • Thermometers — thermometer needed at each site for sick room. 
    • Handwashing stations if insufficient sink access at sites. 
  • Back stock of PPEs 
  • Proper ordering procedures from central location/system 
  • Use of district-approved products only 

COVID-19 Response Teams

Overview

The district and school site COVID-19 response teams ensure implementation of public health measures. 

School Site Response Teams 

The school site safety plan will incorporate plans for ensuring all public health measures are implemented and for responding to COVID-19 concerns. School sites will designate staff to serve on the COVID-19 Response Team and these members will regularly communicate the importance of following these safety measures. 

In the event of a COVID-19 concern, staff should know who to contact. School staff will follow all the steps outlined in Procedures for Managing Illness and Preventing Spread of COVID-19 in the SCUSD Community. The assigned school nurse is trained to coordinate the documentation and tracking of possible exposure, in order to notify local health officials, staff and families in a prompt and responsible manner. Each incident of COVID-19 illness will be reviewed and procedures will be revised or updated as needed to prevent further cases. 

District Response Team 

The district shall routinely revise and update plans and procedures for ensuring all public health measures are implemented and for responding to COVID-19 concerns. Designated department leads are identified for ensuring public health mitigation measures are implemented and followed. Procedures are outlined for responding to any concerns about a COVID-19 concern – see Procedures for Managing Illness and Preventing Spread of COVID-19 in the SCUSD Community.

Procedures for Managing and Preventing the Spread of COVID-19 in the SCUSD Community
Return to Health

Overview

All reports of COVID-19 illness and/or exposures must be immediately reported to Health Services

The following protocols help the district quickly identify communicable diseases, prevent the spread within the SCUSD community, and reduce potential harm. The district response depends on the type and amount of disease. and upon direction from Sacramento County Public Health (SCPH). 

The district is following enhanced preventative measures and heightened surveillance directed by state and county health departments. Protocols and procedures may change depending on the public health situation. 

International and domestic experiences and research have demonstrated that even when a school carefully coordinates, plans, and prepares for delivering in-person services, supports and  instruction, cases of COVID-19 may still occur . Expecting and planning for the occurrence of one or more cases of COVID-19 helps us respond immediately to mitigate the impact, minimize spread of COVID within school/work site, and allows the school/work site to remain open. To help prevent the spread of COVID-19 in the community,  Sac City Unified Health Services will be supporting SCPH and meeting employer mandates by conducting COVID-19 contact tracing within the district. Below are the action guidelines followed when a person within the district becomes ill with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 or is exposed to COVID-19. These guidelines were developed based on CDPH and SCPH guidelines. Prompt and coordinated actions, including case investigation and contact tracing, may inform decision-making about strengthening and focusing mitigation strategies

Responsibilities of School Site Staff

  1. When a student or staff member has one  or more COVID-19 symptoms they must follow the Screening and Stay at Home Requirements (Appendix B).  If an individual has symptoms when present at a work or school site, follow the guidance in Taking Care of a Sick Person at School (Appendix F).

  2. When a student or staff member is diagnosed with or tests positive for COVID-19 or is a close contact of someone with COVID-19 they must report to the Site COVID Response Team Lead or site administrator. 

The Site COVID Response Team Lead must immediately contact Student Support and Health Services via email and/or cell phone:

  • Lisa Musser, RN, Health Services Coordinator II - (916) 826-4863 (district cell); email:  lisa-musser@scusd.edu
  • Paula Kuhlman, RN Lead School Nurse - (916) 320-1538 (district cell); email:  paula-kuhlman@scusd.edu
  • Victoria Flores, Director III, Student Support and Health Services -  (916) 752-3643 (district cell); email: victoria-flores@scusd.edu
  • Rebecca Wall, Health Services Technician - (916) 643-7963; cell (916) 826-3513; email:  rebecca-wall@scusd.edu
  • Health Services Main Line - (916) 643-9412

Additional activities may be required as advised by Student Support and Health Services following county health department orders.

  1.  Alert COVID Response Team Lead or site administrator in the additional high risk situations which must also be immediately reported to Health Services per above:  

    – 10% absence of school population with similar symptoms.

    – 25% of a classroom are absent with similar symptoms.

  2. Follow HIPAA confidentiality laws noting that communicable disease concerns are confidential, and all staff are expected to protect health information except to report to SSHS per below.

  3. Sites must prepare for when someone gets sick. Individuals who have symptoms of illness must be immediately separated in an identified care room to prevent possible transmission of disease to others. Individuals who are sick should go home or to a healthcare facility depending on the severity of their symptoms. (See Appendix E for more information and ideas for setting up a sick room vs first aid room on your campus, and Appendix F for How to Take Care of Sick Students during COVID-19 Pandemic).

Sick students and sick staff must: 

  • Be quickly separated from other students/staff in the care room until picked by parent/guardian or able to go home

  • Wear a disposable face covering 

  • Staff must be identified to care for sick students and be provided and advised to use PPE including disposable face mask, face shield/eye covering and gloves.

  • Attending staff must use standard precautions when assisting a sick individual.  For suspected COVID-19 this includes, disposable face coverings, eye covering/face shield and gloves.

  • Attending staff should maintain at 6 ft distance as much as practicable.

  • Call parent/guardian for immediate pick up

  • If a parent/guardian cannot pick up students, consider procedures for arranging transportation to their home

  • Provide parent/guardian or staff member with Stay at Home/When to Return to School instructions

  • Disinfect all surfaces after the student/staff leaves and before use by others 

  • Advise the individual with COVID-19 symptoms not to return to the school site until they have met the Return to School requirements.  See Appendix B.

  • If COVID-19 is suspected, contact your school nurse or Health Services.  Follow Procedures for COVID-19 Procedures in the SCUSD Community, Appendix X.

  • There is no need to exclude contacts of the sick individual from school until test results are known.

  1. Collect and track illness-related absence information at the time of student or staff absence
  • Train attendance staff to support communicable disease follow-up as directed by the Sacramento County Health Department
  • School site staff responsible for entering attendance data into Infinite Campus may be advised to list reasons for illness, symptoms, and date of onset in the “Comments” section
  1. Require students and staff to remain home per Stay at Home Requirements (Appendix B)
  • Stay home if experiencing the following symptoms of illness:  fever or chills (100.4 degrees or higher), cough, shortness of breath or difficulty breathing, fatigue, muscle or body aches, headache, new loss of taste or smell, sore throat, congestion or runny nose, nausea or vomiting, or diarrhea* Subject to change as revised by CDC 
  • Stay home if advised to isolate or quarantine by your doctor or the health department due to COVID-19 precautions. Reasons include
    • Recent contact with a person with COVID-19
    • Recent diagnosis with COVID-19
    • Recent travel outside the local area
  • Individuals may return to school when one of the following criteria is met (see Appendix B):
    • at least 24 hours with no fever and symptoms have improved AND
    • a COVID-19  test is negative 

OR

  • at least 10 days since symptoms first appeared 

OR

  • Their healthcare provider provides documentation that the symptoms are from an underlying chronic condition or other disease process

Responsibilities of Student Support and Health Services (SSHS) 

Communicable disease monitoring and response is an ongoing responsibility of Health Services staff. SSHS will follow the guidelines and procedure outlined in Procedures for COVID-19 Cases in the SCUSD Community to respond to positive cases and close contacts in order to reduce the spread of COVID-19 in the community. 

  • SSHS will keep up to date with current information and update district and school site administrators regarding the guidance received from SCPH, CDPH and CDC.
  • SSHS staff will verify any reported concern and initiate contact tracing procedures, including speaking directly to families and/or staff.
  • SSHS will coordinate the response to a reported case. Health Services staff will provide information and guidance to individuals, families, administrators and staff regarding quarantine, isolation and testing to ensure public health protocols are followed.

Procedures for COVID-19 in the SCUSD Community

Overview

Definitions

Case

Someone who has tested positive for COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2)

Close Contact

Someone who has been within six feet for 15 minutes or more of a person with COVID-19 during the time the person is infectious (with or without wearing a face covering.) In some school situations, it may be difficult to determine whether individuals have met these criteria. An entire cohort, classroom, or other group may be considered close contacts, particularly if people have spent time together indoors.  If a close contact has tested positive for COVID-19 within the past 90 days they do not need to test or quarantine with a new exposure. 

Individuals who have contact with the Close Contact (contact of a contact) are not required to quarantine and may continue to come to work. For example, If an asymptomatic employee calls their supervisor and notifies them that they are required to stay home because they were a close contact of a confirmed case, the contacts they had at work are not considered exposed and are not required to take any special precautions. They may continue to report to work or school.

Cohort or Stable Group:

A stable group with fixed membership that stays or works together and has limited contact with other persons or groups.

Communication

Statements that advise the community of known exposure cases when a case has been physically present at the work site. These communications serve to advise the community about potential risks, inform the community about the district’s actions, provide contact information for Health Services, and reinforce public health guidance

Contact Tracing/Communicable Disease Follow-Up

Contact tracing is a process that slows the spread of infectious diseases, including COVID-19.  Laboratories and medical providers send the names of people who have recently been diagnosed with COVID-19 to their local health department.  The health department asks each person diagnosed with COVID-19 about people with whom they’ve recently had close contact.  These individuals are alerted about the exposure to COVID-19, and they are advised to quarantine.  

School district staff perform contact tracing as it relates to exposures at school or work sites.  The contact tracing process should remain anonymous and confidential, therefore the name of individuals diagnosed with COVID-19 will remain confidential. Employers and schools are required to respond to cases of COVID-19 in order to prevent the spread of COVID-19 at school/work sites.  The sooner health officials are able to alert close contacts, the lower the risk of COVID-19 spreading further.  Prompt and coordinated actions, including case investigation and contact tracing, may inform decision-making about strengthening and focusing mitigation strategies.  See below for District Contact Tracing Procedures.

All individuals are advised to sign up for the CA Notify alert system, California’s cell phone exposure notification system to get COVID-19 exposure alerts and to protect those around you.

COVID-19 Symptoms

  • Fever or chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headache
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Sore throat
  • Congestion or runny nose
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea

Infectious Period 

The time the person is infectious for a symptomatic individual is two days before their Covid-19 symptoms began and for an asymptomatic individual is two days before the positive test result, through the end of their isolation period.  

Isolation

A period of time a person with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 infection must stay home, separate from others and follow other precautions. The isolation ends after the person’s symptoms are improving, at least 24 hours free of fever, and at least 10 days from the day their symptoms began. Refer to Sacramento County Home Isolation Order and Guidance.

Outbreak

CDPH defines a school outbreak as three or more confirmed or probable cases of staff or students occurring within a 14-day period who are epidemiologically-linked in the school, are from different households, and are not contacts of each other in any other investigation cases (e.g., transmission likely occurred in the school setting).

Quarantine

A period of time from the date of last exposure that the person must stay home, separate from others, and follow other precautions. Refer to Sacramento County Home Quarantine Order and Guidance.

Legal Authority for Reporting Communicable Disease

Schools are also required to report cases of COVID-19 to the local health department.  California law (17 C.C.R. section 2508) requires anyone in charge of a K-12 public or private school to report at once to the local health officer the presence or suspected presence of any of the communicable disease, which includes COVID-19.  Schools are authorized under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) to disclose personally identifiable information without parental consent to local health departments regarding COVID-19 testing and cases. (20 USC § 1232g(b)(1)(I).)

Every local educational agency (school district, county office of education, and charter school) and private school in California shall notify its local health officer of any known case of COVID-19 among any student or employee who was present on a K-12 public or private school campus within the 10 days preceding a positive test for COVID-19. Specifically, the local educational agency or private school shall report the following information:

  • The full name, address, telephone number, and date of birth of the individual who tested positive;
  • The date the individual tested positive, the school(s) at which the individual was present on-site within the 10 days preceding the positive test, and the date the individual was last on-site at any relevant school(s); and
  • The full name, address, and telephone number of the person making the report.
  • This information shall be reported to the local health officer by telephone within twenty-four hours from the time an individual within the local educational agency or private school is first made aware of a new case.

District Contact Tracing Procedures

*including community partners or contractors working at a district facility 

School district staff conduct contact tracing for students and staff focusing on school and work site exposures.  Actions taken are based on guidance from Sacramento County Public Health and California Department of Public Health.  The chart below details actions taken for each of the possible scenarios.  Community contact tracing, such as follow-up with family, friends and contacts outside of the district, is conducted by and is the role of the Sacramento County Public Health county department. Prompt and coordinated actions, including case investigation and contact tracing, may inform decision-making about strengthening and focusing mitigation strategies.

The chart below details actions taken for each of the possible scenarios.

Scenario 1: An individual (i.e. employee  or student) who has 1 or more COVID-19 symptoms

An individual (i.e. employee or student) who has 1 or more COVID-19 symptoms

  • Fever or chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headache
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Sore throat
  • Congestion or runny nose
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea
Action
  • Send the person home immediately if at the work/school site. If working/learning remotely, advise them to remain home.
  • Recommend testing as soon as possible after first symptoms.
    • If the test is positive notify Health Services and follow steps outlined in #3
  • Refer them to Stay at Home and Return to School Requirements 
  • If 10% of a classroom or 25% of a school (or a cohort of employees) is experiencing similar symptoms SCPH will be consulted and SCUSD will follow any guidance provided. 
  • The work/site/classroom remains open.
Return to work/School Site 

The person may return to the school/work site when:

  • at least 24 hours with no fever and symptoms have improved

AND

  • a COVID-19  test is negative 

OR

  • at least 10 days since symptoms first appeared

OR

  • Their healthcare provider provides documentation that the symptoms are from an underlying chronic condition or other disease process

The workplace/school/classroom remains open.

Communication
  • No communication needed.
  • In the event of a suspected illness outbreak, SCPH will be consulted and a communication may be issued based on their guidance.

Scenario 2: A close contact - An individual who has come in close contact with a confirmed COVID-19 case

Action
  • Send the person home immediately if at a school/work site.  If distance learning or working remotely, advise them to remain home
  • The person must self-quarantine.  Provide quarantine Guidance   
  • Refer for COVID-19 testing 5-7 days from the date of exposure or immediately if symptoms develop. Negative test results do not shorten the 14-day quarantine period.
  • The workplace/school/classroom remains open
  • If a close contact has tested positive for COVID-19 within the past 90 days they do not need to test or quarantine with a new exposure.
Return to Work/School Site
  • The person may return to the school/work site 14 days from the last day they were in close contact with the case given that they do not develop symptoms nor test positive.
    • No other individuals need to quarantine – only Close Contacts must quarantine.  Contacts of contacts do not need to quarantine
    • If the person is a caregiver or is unable to quarantine from the case, they need to quarantine for 14 days after the case ends their home isolation. For example, if an employee’s child is the case the employee must quarantine after their child recovers and is released from isolation, plus an additional 10 days which could be 20 days or more.
Communication
  • No communication needed if exposure did not happen in school setting
  • If the exposure was the result of a case who was physically present at the work/school site — a communication will be sent about the COVID case and any known close contacts (see #3)

Scenario 3: A case – An individual who has confirmed COVID-19 

Action
  • Send the individual home immediately if physically present. If learning/working remotely, advise them to remain home.
  • Notify Health Services Director, Coordinator II and Lead School Nurse via email and provide employee/student name and contact information.
  • The individual must self-isolate for 10 days from symptom onset date, or if asymptomatic 10 days from test date.
  • Provide isolation Guidance
  • If the individual was on site during the infectious period, ensure the primary spaces where the individual spent significant time is disinfected. 
  • Provide documentation of the positive test to Human Resources.
  • Health Services will report positive case to SCPH
  • Identify school Close Contacts within SCUSD
  • Call all Individuals who had close contact and instruct them to follow the process under, “Scenario #2: An individual who is a Close Contact” 
    • In some school situations, it may be difficult to determine whether individuals have met this criterion and an entire cohort, classroom, or other group may need to be considered exposed, particularly if people have spent time together indoors
  • The worksite/school may usually remain open
  • The decision to close classrooms, cohorts, schools, or workplaces depends on the factors unique to each case and the level of infection in the community, and will be made in conjunction with Sacramento County Public Health
Return to Work/School Site​
  • If the individual experiences symptoms the earliest they may return to the school/work site
    • at least 10 days have passed since the date of first symptoms AND
    • at least 24 hours with no fever AND
    • symptoms have improved  
  • If the individual DID NOT experience symptoms the earliest they may return to school/work site
    • at least 10 days have passed since the date tested AND
    • they did not develop symptoms since the date tested
Communication
  • If the individual has physically reported to a work site while infectious, a written or verbal communication will be sent to alert those present about the confirmed COVID-19 case, the window of potential exposure and the district’s actions. 
  • All communications will be district approved through the Director of Student Support & Health Services.

Resources

School Closure Determinations

Overview

Classroom Closure

In some school situations, it may be difficult to determine whether individuals have met the criterion of having “close contact” and an entire cohort, class, or other group may need to be considered exposed, particularly if people have spent time together indoors. If any individual within a classroom community tests positive for COVID-19, the classroom(s) will be closed and all individuals within the classroom community will be required to quarantine. Instruction will move to distance learning during this time.  Contacts of a “close contact” are not required to quarantine and may continue to engage in their typical duties. The school may remain open.  Once the physical space is disinfected, the space may be utilized.  

The class may typically resume after a 14- day quarantine and the following have occurred 

  • Disinfection of the classroom/areas used (site is safe to inhabit one the space is disinfected)
  • Public health investigation 
  • Consultation with the local public health department

School Closure

Individual school closure is recommended based on the number of cases, the percentage of the teacher/students/staff that are positive for COVID-19, and following consultation with the SCPH. Individual school closure may be appropriate in the following situations:

  • Within a 14-day period, an outbreak has occurred in 25% or more of the stable groups in the school
  • Within a 14-day period, at least three outbreaks have occurred in the school AND more than 5% of the school population is infected
  • SCPH may also determine school closure is warranted for other reasons, including results from public health investigation or other local epidemiological data

School may typically reopen after 14-day quarantine and the following have occurred

  • Cleaning and disinfection (site is safe to inhabit one the space is disinfected)
  • Public health investigation 
  • Consultation with the local public health department

District Closure

In consultation with SCPH, district-wide school closures will be considered if 25% or more of schools in the district have closed due to COVID-19 within 14 days. For example, 19 schools are closed within the same two-week span due to COVID-19. SCPH may also determine school and/or district-wide closure is warranted for other reasons, including results from public health investigation or other local epidemiological data. SCUSD will work closely with SCPH to determine when it is safe to reopen the district.

School Site Roles & Responsibilities
Return to Health

Overview

These roles and responsibilities must be widely shared with responsible staff and also be included in Staff Handbooks, Student/Parent Handbooks, planners or other communication means. 

Administrator Checklist 

  • Follow all Individual Health Precautions for Students and Staff and Mitigation Standards for SCUSD Sites.

  • Actively model and support all required public health measures. Teach everyone it is OK to correct each other — use “please” and “thank you” to everyone when reminded about public health measures. 
  • Make changes to site physical spaces and/or implement policies to enforce mitigation measures. 
  • Provide frequent communication about COVID-19 and cold/flu prevention efforts for students and staff. Use all modalities — email, announcements on speakers, announcements by teachers, signage, and direct instructions at staff meetings. 
  • Designate staff liaison(s) to be responsible for responding to COVID-19 concerns. Employees should know who they are and how to contact them. 
  • Ensure posters are placed in impactful areas. Signage should be visible in all bathrooms, classrooms, and public spaces. Post information on social media regularly. Distribute flyers and posters widely on the following topics: Signs and Symptoms of COVID-19 
    • Physical distancing 
    • Face covering guidance 
    • Stay home when sick guidelines 
    • Cough and Sneeze Hygiene 
    • Occupancy limits 
    • Mental Well-Being and Crisis Support Lines 
  • Know and ensure that staff follows Communicable Disease Response Protocols for Illness during COVID-19 Pandemic. Contact Health Services immediately if:
    • A student or staff is diagnosed with, is suspected of having, or has been exposed to COVID-19 or other reportable communicable disease 
    • Consult Health Services if a large number of the school population or any single class is sick with similar symptoms
  • Ensure teaching staff provides students with distance learning opportunities, full-credit options, and extended time to complete missing assignments due to illness related absences. 
  • Ensure staff and student attendance is entered in a timely manner on a daily basis. Document and take notice of any patterns of absences with similar symptoms. 
  • Encourage electronic communication, including submitting and/or sharing electronic forms (i.e. documents requiring signature, homework submission, etc). 
  • Provide designated space and supervision for sick students until they are able to go home (i.e. Sick Student Area) that is not used by other individuals). 
  • Provide designated space and supervision for students who need first aid, medication administration, procedures at school, etc. (i.e. Well Student Area). 
  • Reinforce Stay at Home Requirements (Appendix B) by sending home any students or staff who have signs or symptoms of illness. 
  • Ensure office staff have appropriate resources to support sick students or staff including non-touch thermometer, face covering/mask, water and hand soap, hand sanitizer, facial tissues, gloves, goggles or face shields. 
  • Follow any guidance provided by Student Support and Health Services (SSHS) and Sacramento County Public Health (SCPH). 
  • Ensure all appropriate staff are aware of students with health needs and are familiar with any Emergency Care Plans, including all substitute staff. 
  • Encourage activities and strategies that promote positive coping for Adults and Children during times of stress. 
  • Direct any person with heightened concerns to District resources and SCPH resources. Discuss concerns with School Nurse and/or Student Support and Health Services staff. 

Office Staff/Attendance Staff Checklist 

  • Actively model and support all required public health measures. Teach everyone it is okay to correct each other — use “please” and “thank you” to everyone when reminded about public health measures. 
  • Distribute flyers and posters widely on the following topics: physical distancing, face cloth coverings, hand hygiene, cough/cold hygiene, and staying home when sick. Ensure posters are placed in every entrance, classroom, bathroom and other impactful areas. Post information on social media regularly. 
  • Encourage electronic communication, including submitting and/or sharing electronic forms (i.e. documents requiring signature). 
  • Ensure office staff have appropriate resources to support sick students or staff, including face mask/ shield, non-touch thermometer, water and hand soap, facial tissues, gloves, and goggles. 
  • Reinforce Stay at Home Requirements (Appendix B) by sending home any students or staff who are sick. 
  • Provide an care space for sick students and staff until they are able to go home 
  • Reinforce health precautions for parents – wear mask, use hand sanitizer, maintain distance. 
  • Ensure Staff and Student attendance is entered in a timely manner on a daily basis.
    • Follow procedures if directed to document student illness symptoms in Infinite Campus 
  • Know and communicate to parents the Stay at Home Requirements (Appendix B) for sick and exposed students. 
  • Work with the school nurse to follow protocols that lower the risk of infectious students being on campus. 
  • Direct health related questions to the school nurse or to their family doctor. 
  • Follow Communicable Disease Response Protocols for Illness during COVID-19 Pandemic if the following situations occur – contact Student Support and Health Services immediately:
    • Student or staff are diagnosed with, are suspected of having, or have been exposed to COVID-19 or other communicable disease 
    • A large number of staff or students 2 are out sick with similar symptoms
  • Ensure all appropriate staff are aware of students with health needs and are familiar with any Emergency Care Plans, including all substitute staff. 

Operations/Custodial Staff Checklist 

  • Actively model and support all required public health measures. Teach everyone it is OK to correct each other — use “please” and “thank you” to everyone when reminded about public health measures. 
  • Ensure school has adequate supplies of handwashing materials, facial tissues, district-approved disinfecting cleaner, etc. 
  • Maintain a stock of cleaning materials and personal protective equipment to ensure readiness – order additional supplies as needed. 
  • Routine Disinfecting: On a daily basis, disinfect all common spaces and classroom areas.
    • High-touch areas and areas where sick students or staff were present should be routinely disinfected, following established district guidelines. 
  • Follow all established district protocols for cleaning and disinfecting. 
  • Contact Operations Department if a large-scale deep disinfecting/cleaning is required. 
  • Encourage electronic communication, including submitting and/or sharing electronic forms (i.e. documents requiring signature or orders). 

Food Service Staff Checklist 

  • Actively model and support all required public health measures. Teach everyone it is OK to correct each other — use “please” and “thank you” to everyone when reminded about public health measures. 
  • Follow department policies that reduce risk of disease transmission
    • One-way passage ways through meal delivery 
    • Increase ventilation for enclosed areas (open doors and windows) 
    • Follow all Nutrition Services Disinfectant protocols and procedures 
    • Ensure your space has the following supplies – hand sanitizer, facial tissue, garbage cans with liners (changed daily), disinfectant wipes or spray, paper towels, gloves and face coverings 

Teacher Checklist 

  • Actively model and support all required public health measures. Teach everyone it is okay to correct each other — use “please” and “thank you” to everyone when reminded about public health measures. 
  • Reinforce and follow health precautions with your students
    • Physical distancing at all times — at least 6 feet. 
    • Ensure compliance with maximum occupancy of individuals in each classroom. 
    • Provide highly visible floor markings in all shared spaces. 
    • Desks must face in the same direction. 
    • Establish regular times for hand washing/hand sanitizer — including upon entry to school/class, before eating, whenever entering a new room, before going home. 
    • Proper handwashing is one of the best ways to prevent illness — show videos that teach the proper procedures for handwashing
    • Open doors and windows. Maximize ventilation through the room. 
    • Have students remain together during recess or mealtimes (cohorting). 
    • Ensure distancing protocols during meals — use alternative locations such as the classroom or outside. 
    • Close shared spaces in classrooms — remove reading corners or hang-out spaces 
    • Ensure all students have individual supplies and no sharing of food or items. Store personal items-backpack/jacket/lunch bag at the student desk. 
    • Ensure your classroom has the following district approved supplies — hand sanitizer, facial tissue, garbage cans with liners (changed daily), disinfectant spray and paper towels. 
    • Disinfect shared equipment such as desks, computers, piano keyboards, lab equipment, wood or auto shop tools, etc. after each student. 
    • Limit visitors/volunteers to the classroom — permit only those that are essential. 
  • Send any visibly sick students or students who say they do not feel well to the office: i.e. student has symptoms such as unusual fatigue, coughing, sneezing, runny nose, vomiting, diarrhea, appears to have a fever/flushed cheeks, diaphoretic without exercise, red/crusty eyes. 
  • Ensure you are aware of any students in your class with health needs and are familiar with their Emergency Care Plans, including providing this information for substitute teachers. 
  • If a student in a cohort requires daily medication, the teacher may manage medication in the classroom for students to limit their need to go to the office. Training will be provided

School Nurse Checklist 

  • Actively model, teach, positively reinforce, support, check compliance and re-teach all required public health measures. We must establish “new” norms — understanding it will take time and constant positive reinforcement. Teach everyone it is okay to correct each other — teach “please” and “thank you” to everyone when reminded about public health measures. 
  • Follow SCPH guidelines to support contact tracing and other public health measures. 
  • Provide training and information as needed to site administrators and staff. 
  • Work with attendance to support Stay at Home (Appendix B) guidelines. Provide training, monitoring and reinforcement of district procedures and any new procedures required by the health department as a result of communicable disease follow-up
  • Work with administration to set up a sick care room and first aid room per guidelines. See Appendix E.
  • Encourage precautions and measures that reduce risk of disease transmission. Identify risks and work with staff to improve behaviors. 
  • Look for visible signs of illness in students or staff - assist to ensure sites have supplies including a thermometer to check temperature. 
  • When possible, school nurses, nurse interns, or other community partners will provide lessons on staying healthy and preventing cold/flu (i.e., handwashing and coughing/sneezing etiquette). 
  • Reinforce standard wellness protocols by training staff to recognize and send home any students or staff who are sick per Stay at Home Requirements (Appendix B)
  • Follow Communicable Disease Response Protocols for Illness during COVID-19 Pandemic for all communicable disease per Communicable Disease Chart, and contact appropriate SSHS staff members as required (see Health Services Policy and Procedures – Infectious Disease). 
  • Encourage electronic communication, including submitting and/or sharing electronic forms (i.e. documents requiring signature, etc). 

Bus Drivers/Transportation Checklist 

  • Actively model and support all required public health measures. Teach everyone it is okay to correct each other — use “please” and “thank you” to everyone when reminded about public health measures. 
  • Ensure adequate space for physical distancing at bus stops and school loading and unloading zones 
  • Reinforce with parent and students steps they must take to keep students and staff safe during loading and unloading 
  • All riders should wear face coverings while waiting for the bus and on the bus, unless contraindicated. 
  • Each rider must use hand sanitizer before entering the bus. 
  • Physical distancing should be maximized to the extent practicable.
  • Ensure good ventilation with open/partially open windows. 
  • Buses should be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected daily and after transporting any individual who is exhibiting symptoms of COVID-19. 

Support Staff Checklist 

  • Actively model and support all required public health measures. Teach everyone it is okay to correct each other — use “please” and “thank you” to everyone when reminded about public health measures. 
  • Look for visible signs of illness in students or staff. Refer visibly sick students and staff to the office or school nurse. Be aware of the district Stay at Home Requirements (Appendix B)
  • Encourage activities and strategies that promote positive coping during times of stress for adults and children. 
  • Encourage electronic communication rather than in person, including submitting and/or sharing electronic forms (i.e. documents requiring signature, etc). 
  • Provide telesupports rather than in-person when feasible. 
  • Report any concerns about suspected communicable diseases to school site Administrators or school nurse. 

Student Checklist 

  • Let your parent/guardian know if you feel sick and remain home if you have a fever or other symptoms 
  • If you become ill during the school day go immediately to the school office or health office to be checked. 
  • Be kind and understanding with others. Use “please” and “thank you” when talking about or being reminded about public health. 
  • Let others make their own choices. Do not tease or bully people who look, behave, or believe differently than your family. 

Parents/Guardian Checklist 

  • Teach your child the public health guidelines — reinforce and practice these measures when in public. 
  • Be accepting of other people’s choices who may look, behave, or believe differently than your family. 

Key Communication Points & Strategy
Return to Health

Overview

Messaging Before School Starts 

  • Student and staff safety is our top priority.
  • School will reopen with modifications to programs and services to protect children and staff from COVID-19 infection. The district will follow the guidance of state and county health departments for implementation of precautions and modifications to school programs.
  • The physical and mental health and safety of our community is the responsibility of each of us. Our behaviors affect each other.
  • The current CDC guidelines outline five key components: isolation of ill individuals, personal hygiene, physical distancing, use of face coverings, and disinfection of surfaces. These actions together significantly reduce the risk of spreading COVID-19.  
  • Print Keep Each Other Safe Guidelines, Appendix A in annual parent notification.
  • Ask parents/guardians to consider making face coverings for reuse when in public and sending children to school with a face covering. Face coverings will be provided if a child does not have one.
  • Prevention of the spread of COVID-19 and the ability of our school to remain open depends on all of us following the Personal Hygiene Guideline (Appendix D) and the Stay at Home Requirements (Appendix B).  
  • We are in this together.

Messaging During Opening 

  • Student and staff safety is our top priority. 
  • We must be ready for changing conditions. Ongoing evaluation and modifications will be necessary.
  • The district will follow state and county orders. District and school staff are working closely with Sacramento County Public Health, Sacramento County Office of Education, and surrounding districts to monitor the current situation, address concerns, inform and educate students.
  • Routine disinfecting protocols are being followed.. High-touch areas and areas where sick students or staff were present will be disinfected, following established district guidelines.
  • Prevention of the spread of COVID-19 and the ability of our school to remain open depends on all of us following the Personal Hygiene Guideline (Appendix D) and the Stay at Home Requirements (Appendix B).  

Ongoing Communications 

  • We prepare for the cold and flu season every year, by providing immunization clinics for eligible families, and conducting awareness campaigns to help prevent the spread of communicable diseases. 
  • Keep students home from school when sick and seek the advice of a healthcare provider for COVID-19 symptoms. 
  • Should we receive a concern regarding the exposure or confirmation of case of COVID-19, SCUSD will respond immediately regarding the exposure or confirmation of a COVID-19 case, using our established protocols and guidance provided by SCPH officials and the California Department of Public Health – School Guidance on COVID-19. 
  • Prevention of the spread of COVID-19 and the ability of our school to remain open depends on all of us following the Personal Hygiene Guideline (Appendix D) and the Stay at Home Requirements (Appendix B)
  • We are in this together. 

Messaging on Resources/Support 

  • We know this is an anxious time for our community and our hearts go out to those who are ill, have lost family members, who have lost jobs and are experiencing hardships brought on by the pandemic and mitigation measures. 
  • Our thoughts are with all of our families and children who are affected. 
  • Please note that there have been reports of students and others being stigmatized or bullied. We urge our community members to help prevent any discrimination and to respect the privacy of our community members. We encourage everyone in our community to treat each other with compassion, respect, and kindness as we work together to keep our community healthy and physically and emotionally safe. 
  • See COVID-19 Frequently Asked Questions on the SCUSD website. 

Communication Strategies for School Site Staff and Administration 

  • Establish and advertise widely a single source/webpage for up-to-date information on the planning, pandemic response and expectations for staff, students, and families. 
  • Utilize Communications to distribute accurate information. 
  • Training of community liaisons currently at school sites. 
  • Meetings with PTA. 
  • Announcements during school hours – before school, between classes, before recess and at lunch to reinforce personal hygiene guidelines. 
  • Designate a staff/community liaison or liaisons to be responsible for responding to COVID-19 concerns. Employees should know who they are and how to contact them. 
  • Use all-calls, all emails, superintendent letters, school site websites, remind texts. 
  • Use electronic billboards/marquis. 
  • Use banners, signage through the school to reinforce messaging. 
  • Translation of communications should be provided based on the threshold languages of the community.

References & Appendices
Return to Health

Overview

References

 

Appendices

Appendix A – Annual Parent Notice Insert – COVID-19 Precautions for 20-21 School Year

Appendix B – Stay at Home and Return to School Requirements for Students and Staff during COVID-19

Appendix C – Screening Requirements for Persons Entering School Sites

Appendix D – Personal Hygiene Requirements for Students and Staff during COVID-19 Pandemic

Appendix E – First Aid, Nursing Procedures, Medications, and Taking Care of Sick Students

Appendix F – Guidelines for Taking Care of Sick Students during COVID-19 Pandemic

Appendix G – Training for Staff, Parents and Students

Appendix H – Ideas for Setting up Classrooms for Teachers

Appendix I – Ideas for Hand Washing Routines for Teachers

Appendix J – Immunization Planning

Appendix L- COVID-19 Student Face Covering Exemption Request and Medical Certification

Appendix K – Respiratory Hygiene/Cough and Sneeze Etiquette

Appendix X – Procedures for the COVID-19 Community

Appendix Y - Quick Guide for School Staff

Appendix Z - COVID-19 Symptom Decision Tree